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Fish Adversory for Delaware

Virginia to Maine

Moderator: admin

Fish Adversory for Delaware

Postby vonbrandt » Sat Oct 04, 2003 8:27 pm

Fishing is an important activity in Delaware's inland and coastal waters. Among the benefits provided by fishing are quality recreational opportunities, direct and indirect input to the local economy, food for recreational anglers and food for the commercial marketplace.

Fish are a good source of readily digestible protein, they are low in fat and sodium, and the unique type of fats found in fish are believed to provide cardiovascular benefits.

Despite the general benefits of fishing and fish consumption, there has been a growing concern regarding the presence of chemical toxins in the flesh of finfish and shellfish taken from Delaware waters and the associated health risk to anglers and their families who consume their catch. The existence of chemicals in the edible portion of some fish has resulted in the public advisories listed in the table below. These advisories are as a result of joint action taken by the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control and the Department of Health and Social Service's Division of Public Health. The advisories were deemed necessary because of the nature of pollutants such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Even when present in the water in extremely small amounts, some chemicals tend to build up over time in fish tissue because fish can absorb and concentrate contaminants from food they eat, or to a lesser extent, directly from the water. The amount of contaminants fish accumulate depends on the species, size, age, sex, and feeding area of the fish. Generally speaking, older larger individual fish accumulate the most contaminants, although in some cases contaminants are shed each time the fish spawn. Since fish accumulate many contaminants in their fatty tissues, certain species with higher oil content can pose more risk than others when both inhabit polluted areas.

More information concerning health advisories for Delaware waters can be obtained by contacting the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control at (302) 739-4506, and/or by phoning the Division of Public Health at (302) 739-4071 or (302) 739-5617.




Delaware Fish Consumption Advisories as of February, 2002

Waterbody
Species
Geographical Extent
Contaminants of Concern*
Advice

Becks Pond
All Finfish
Entire Pond
PCBs, Mercury
No more than six 8-ounce meals per year

Delaware River
All Finfish
Delaware State Line to the C&D Canal
PCBs, *beep* Dioxin, Mercury, Chlorinated Pesticides
No Consumption

Red Lion Creek
All Finfish
Rt 13 to the Delaware River
PCBs, Dioxin
No more than three 8-ounce meals per year

Lower Delaware River and Delaware Bay
Striped Bass, Channel Catfish, White Catfish, American Eel, White Perch
C&D Canal to Delaware Bay Mouth
PCBs, Mercury, Dieldrin
No more than one 8-ounce meal per year.

Tidal Brandywine River
All Finfish
River Mouth to Baynard Blvd.
PCBs
No Consumption

Non-Tidal Brandywine River
All Finfish
Baynard Blvd. To Pennsylvania Line
PCBs, Dioxin
No more than two 8-ounce meals per year

Shellpot Creek
All Finfish
Rt. 13 to the Delaware River
PCBs, Chlordane
No Consumption

Tidal Christina River
All Finfish
River Mouth to Smalley’s Dam
PCBs, Dieldrin
No Consumption

Non-tidal Christina River
All Finfish
Smalley’s Dam to I-95
PCBs
No more than six 8-ounce meals per year

Little Mill Creek
All Finfish
Creek mouth to Kirkwood Highway
PCBs
No Consumption

Tidal White Clay Creek
All Finfish
River Mouth to Route 4
PCBs
No Consumption

Non Tidal White Clay Creek
All Finfish
Rte. 4 to Paper Mill Road
PCBs
No more than one 8-ounce meal per month

Red Clay Creek
All Finfish
State Line to Stanton
PCBs, Dioxin, Chlorinated Pesticides
No Consumption

Chesapeake & Delaware Canal
All Finfish
Entire Canal in Delaware
PCBs
No Consumption

Appoquinimink River
All Finfish
Tidal Portions
PCBs, Dioxin
No More than one 8-ounce meal per year

Drawyers Creek
All Finfish
Tidal Portions
PCBs, DDT
No More than one 8-ounce meal per year

Silver Lake Middletown
All Finfish
Entire Lake
PCBs, Dieldrin, DDT, Dioxin
No More than one 8-ounce meal per year

St. Jones River
All Finfish
River Mouth to Silver Lake Dam
PCBs, Dioxin, Mercury, *beep*
No More than two 8-ounce meals per year

Moores Lake
All Finfish
Entire Pond
PCBs, DDT
No More than two 8-ounce meals per year

Silver Lake Dover
All Finfish
Entire Pond
PCBs, Dioxin, Mercury
No More than two 8-ounce meals per year

Wyoming Mill Pond
All Finfish
Entire Pond
PCBs, Dioxin, DDT
No More than two 8-ounce meals per year

* The pollutant listed first is of the greatest concern in this system.




National Methylmercury Fish Consumption Advisory
On January 12, 2001, EPA and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued concurrent national fish consumption advisories recommending restricted consumption of freshwater coastal and marine species of fish due to methylmercury contamination. EPA’s advisory targeted women of childbearing age and children who may be consuming noncommercial freshwater fish caught by family or friends. The advisory specifically recommends that women who are pregnant or could become pregnant, women who are nursing a baby, and their young children, should limit consumption of freshwater fish caught by family and friends to one meal per week unless the state health department has different advice for the specific waters where the fish are caught. For adults, one meal is six ounces of cooked fish or eight ounces uncooked fish; for a young child, one meal is two ounces of cooked fish or three ounces of uncooked fish.

FDA issued advice on mercury in fish bought from stores and restaurants, which includes ocean and coastal fish as well as other types of commercial fish; FDA advises that women who are pregnant or could become pregnant, nursing mothers, and young children, not eat shark, swordfish, king mackerel, or tilefish. FDA also advises that women who are pregnant or could become pregnant may eat an average of 12 ounces of fish purchased in stores and restaurants each week. EPA recommends that women who are or could become pregnant, nursing mothers, and young children follow the FDA advice for coastal and ocean fish caught by family and friends. EPA and FDA both recommend that the public check with state or local health authorities for specific consumption advice about fish caught or sold in the local area. The EPA and FDA advisories are available through the EPA fish advisory website.




Cutting Out The Risks
Avoid eating fish from the waters listed in the above table.
Eat smaller fish of a species as long as it is of legal length.
Eat smaller portions of fish and eat fewer meals of fish.
Women of child bearing age and children may want to avoid eating any species of fish suspected to be a problem.
Dress and cook the fish in a manner that reduces contaminants.

Steve vonBrandt/S&K Guide Service/Professional Bass Guides/Tackle Dealers
B.A.S.S./N.A.F.C./Life Member
1998, 99, and 2001 Big Bass World Champs/De
Redman/BFL regional qualifiers
www.delawaretackle.com
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vonbrandt
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Location: Wilmington, Delaware

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